Vegetarian Diet

Different types
of vegetarian diets
explained




Vegetarian Diet



Information about some
of the different
Vegetarians


What Do Vegetarian
Eat



Some people think that eating
vegetarian style is harder than
eating a meat based diet.
But in actual fact once you get
started and know all the ins
and outs you might find it easier.

Eating fresh fruit, veggies, nuts,
seeds and nut/seed butters do
not need cooking and very little
preparation.

Also cooking up a large batch
of beans, legumes, lentils
and grains, then freezing
them, can be done once a
week or monthly, this will
preparations.

Your local grocery store will
probably have a section
dedicated to organic produce
and organic grocery staples.

Also your local health food
store will have a variety
of vegetarian goods to pick
from.


Vegans
(pronounced Vee-gun)



This diet group does not eat or
use meat, fish, poultry or
anything that has a face.

Nor do they use any
by-products derived from
the animal sources
mentioned, such as dairy
products, eggs, and honey.

Some vegans will use gelatin,
lanolin, leather, wool, fur,
and silk.

Soaps and cosmetics made
from or tested on animals
are not used either.

And some vegans will not eat
yeast products.

They adopt a plant based diet,
consisting of vegetables, fruit,
whole grains, legumes, lentils,
seeds and nuts.

This group generally has
become Vegan because of
their concern about the
environment and
cruelty to animals.

Most Vegans are trying to
live a healthy lifestyle.



Vegetarians ( Pseudo)



This classification does not
exclude all animal foods
or by-products.

Frequently they will eat
animal foods on special
occasions.
And they do not have a
problem with using dairy
products, eggs, or honey.

They will also wear some
wool, silk and leather.
This group also does
consume a large amount
of plant foods.

Generally this group will
live this lifestyle to attain
good health.



Lacto-ovo Vegetarians



This category of vegetarians
will eat dairy products and
eggs, because it does not
involve the slaughter of
animals.

They do not eat animal flesh
of any kind.
Otherwise their diet consists
of plant based foods.

This group may adopt this
lifestyle for religious,
environmental, or health
reasons, and also animal
cruelty concerns.



Lacto Vegetarian



This group practices the
same diet as Vegans, but
also consumes milk and
milk products.



Fruitarians

Again this category practices
the same diet as Vegans,
but will only eat foods that
do not kill the plant.


As you see, these diets do
not merely consist of
vegetables and raw food.
In order to maintain the
proper balance for good
nutrition, you have to
follow some rules.

Poorly planned vegan diets
are deficient in vitamin
B12 (riboflavin), iron,
vitamin D, calcium, iodine,
and omega-3 fatty acids.

Your body needs good fats,
carbohydrates, protein,
vitamins and minerals to
thrive.

The real challenge here is
trying to eat adequate protein
and getting the missing
vitamins, minerals and
healthy oils.

Protein consists of amino acids,
that build and repair body
tissues, and for the formation
of hormones and enzymes.

Also proteins are needed for
the creation of antibodies
to fight infection.
Proteins serve as a major
energy supply.

All the carbohydrates have
some amino acids, but in
varying amounts, some
low and some higher.

You will need to know which
carbohydrates to combine
together in order to make
a complete protein.
It takes nine essential amino
acids to make a complete
protein.

Eggs, cows milk, meat, and
fish contain high quality protein
and contain large amounts of
essential amino acids.

Soybeans, quinoa, and spinach
contain high quality amino
acids.

For example grains contain
lower amounts of lysine
(an essential amino)
and legumes are lower in
methionine
(an essential amino).

So you will want to combine
foods low in one amino with
another high in that amino.

These two examples
compliment each other.

Eat a variety of unrefined
grains, seeds, nuts, legumes,
and vegetables daily so that
you will consume enough
of the essential amino acids.

For every kilogram of your
body weight you will need
0.8 grams of protein or for
every pound of weight you
will need to consume
approximately 0.36 grams.
This is based loosely on body
size and calories expended.

The only carbohydrates in a
plant based diet that contain
the vitamin B12 are
Nutritional Yeast, Miso,
Tempeh, and a seaweed
called Nori.

B12 is needed for the
formation and maturation
of red blood cells, the
synthesis of DNA, and
normal nerve function.

Vegetarians who are not
Vegan obtain B12 from
Dairy products and eggs.

Vitamin D is not found in
Vegan diets.

Humans produce Vitamin D
when exposed to sunlight.

Light skinned people need
15-30 minutes of exposure
3 times a week.
Darker skinned or very
tanned people will not
absorb as much Vitamin D,
therefore supplementation
is needed.

A good vegetarian multivitamin
will usually have the vitamins
and minerals that you will need
as a back up.

It is possible to have a good
vegetarian diet, by careful
planning and variety.

Just take your time and slowly
make your dietary changes.

Try temporarily eating
vegetarian for only one meal
a day then gradually adding
more meals when you are
more adept at making the
changes and are more
comfortable with the new
eating style. br />

Good Protein Sources
to Replace Meat



Beans, peas, lentils, soy
products like tofu, and
tempeh.

Almonds, cashews, tahini,
sunflower seeds, peanuts
and nut/seed butters.


Iron Supplements



Molasses, and fortified whole
grain cereals, and breads.

Floradix
(vegetable/fruit source iron)

Vitamin C containing fruits
and veggies help with iron
absorption.

Vegans need twice as much
iron as those on a meat
eating diet.


Dairy Alternatives



Calcium fortified soymilk,
tofu, and yogurt.

Almond milk and Rice milk.
All nut milks.


High Calcium Foods

Fortified soy milk, almonds,
sesame seeds and bok Choy


Fiber Supplements

Psyllium husks, and whole
grains and seeds.


Iodine supplements

Seaweeds and Kelp

Iodized salt


Omega - 3 Fatty
Acids



Flaxseed oil which contains
ALA and EPA
(a-linolenic acid
eicosapentaenoic acid)

Fish oil which contains
EPA and DHA
(eicosapentaenoic acid and
docosahexaenoic acid)

Some Eggs from chickens
fed a special diet of omega
3 fatty acids.

Algae oil which contains
DHA and EPA

Possible interactions with
some medications may
cause blood thinning effects.

May also help cholesterol
lowering medications to
work more efficiently.

Has been reported to help
with asthma symptoms,
breast cancer prevention,
irritable bowel disease,
menstrual pain and
depression.


Good Fats



Extra Virgin Olive oil, Virgin
Coconut oil, and Flax oil,

Walnut oil, Avocado oil,
Hemp oil and Fish oils if
you are only nominally
vegan.

These oils are better consumed
without heating, for optimal
brain and eye health.

They have been reported to
also have anti- inflammatory
properties.

It has been reported that
all vegetarian diet forms
have some health benefits
such as.

May lower blood sugar levels
in Diabetes.

It is believed that low-fat,
plant based diets may improve
the bodies use of insulin.

May offer protection from
heart and renal diseases,
obesity, and rheumatoid
arthritis.

And reportedly cuts bad
cholesterol by the increased
fiber intake.

Because vegetarian diets
are much higher in fiber,
they also reduce cravings
and you feel full longer.


Kitchen Chart



Some simple rules of thumb
for combining meatless foods
to produce nutritionally
usable protein.

Milk combined with grains,
Legumes combined with
grains


And the following
combinations:

1 part legumes and 2 parts
milk

2 parts legumes and 3 parts
seeds

1 part legumes and 3 parts
whole grains

4 parts milk and 3 parts
whole grains

1 part milk (scant) and
1 part seeds

1 part milk (scant) and
1 part peanuts or
other nuts

1 part milk and 1 part
potato

Legumes = beans, lentils,
peanuts, split peas

Whole Grains = spaghetti,
noodles, rice, barley,
cornmeal


Good Organizations
to Source Vegetarian
Information



The Vegetarian Resource
Group at www.vrg.org

Alive at www.alive.com

Vegan Health.Org
at www.veganhealth.org

If you have any health issues,
and take medications; to
avoid potential side effects
and interactions please check
with your Health Care
Professional before trying
any new diet or dietary
supplements.

Also pregnant woman, babies
and children should take
special care when embarking
on any vegetarian diet.

Make sure your choices are
based on sound nutritional
knowledge of the foods you
are eating.

And supplement any missing
essential elements in your
diet by taking vitamins.

This article has been provided
for information value only,
not to influence your choices.


Index



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